On Cluster B and Borderline - Talk About Marriage
Physical & Mental Health Issues Marriage and relationships are difficult by themselves, but coping with physical or mental health problems can make things even more difficult.

User Tag List

 55Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
post #1 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-25-2016, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
EllaSuaveterre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 512
On Cluster B and Borderline

I see a lot of posts- and occasionally even whole threads, on TAM or LoveShack or SurvivingInfidelity about "Cluster B" personality disordered people, particularly Borderline personality disorder. Especially in cases where the BPD-afflicted person is a WS, the advice ranges from "Dump them immediately" to "Lock them up. Cluster-B people can't love."

Now, I'm not going to argue whether cluster-B people cannot love or feel empathy. Because I don't know. I have Borderline Personality Disorder. I'm also a Wayward Wife. I don't know if my capacity to love or to empathize with other people is as strong as everyone else's. But I will tell you that I want to love and be loved with all my heart, and I think I can safely speak for most other Borderlines and say they want the same. At its core, from what I've learned in DBT (the therapy for BPD, which I've been in since my A in 2014) BPD is a fear of abandonment. A fear of being left alone and having to look after and/or put up with yourself.

The stereotypical picture of the Borderline Wayward is someone who doesn't give a rat's tail about anyone but themselves, has no idea how to love or feel anything but rage and contempt, and will burn you in your bed for looking at them the wrong way.

I'm not like that. I get angry and have vindictive feelings more often than most, but I never act on them. The only person I ever take my anger and pain out on is myself. If somebody leaves me or slights me, I will probably be angry for a few weeks and grieved for a few months, but the only person I ever truly blame for their absence is myself. I've struggled with self-harm, suicidal ideation, eating disorders, and generally non-existent self-esteem. I couldn't hurt anyone who would, in my mind, lessen their quality of life by loving me. Not knowingly anyway.

During my A, I was not maniacally laughing and saying, "I'm going to ruin my husband's life! He'll never know what hit him! He deserves to be so miserable! Muahahahaha!!!" No way. I hated myself. I hated what I (at the time felt I) was being forced to do. I felt I had little to no agency in ending the affair. I genuinely felt my husband would be better off if I left him and/or died, both of which would have eventually happened if the A continued.

And I only chose to start the affair because I was afraid my husband was going to leave me and I couldn't bear to be alone.

Why did I think he was going to leave me? Because I hated myself. Why on earth wouldn't he hate me too? The OM was abusive, but I didn't see it as abuse at the time. I thought the OM knew how horrible I was and was only treating me like I deserved. Any kindness was too good to be real. My H would be better off if the OM murdered me. At least I'd be out of his hair.

For the entire first year post-A, I was too wrapped up in healing from the anxiety and depression the A gave me (I'm aware that sounds horrible to say) and for the second year, I am truly ashamed to admit I didn't classify what I had done as infidelity because OM was abusive. Now, as of about July of this year, I have started reading and understanding more about what I did to my BH and how I can help him.

Now that I've read "Who Will You Become", "How to Help your Spouse Heal From Your Affair", and "Not Just Friends", I have realized that I, in spite of being abused myself, also abused my poor, undeserving, gentle husband. I could have ended the affair- abuse or not, mortal terror or not- at any time, and I chose not to. My beloved BH didn't ask for any of this. I did. I have come to realize how utterly misguided it was to think that an exit affair would leave him without hurt feelings and/or with a sense of relief that I was gone. A WS can be the most vile piece of hot garbage in the world, and an A can and likely will still leave the BS with severe trauma that is equivalent to a soldier's battlefield PTSD. Now that I know that, I absolutely despise myself for having hurt my BS like that. It's been a serious struggle not to relapse into self-harm or anorexia in order to numb the self-loathing. But so far I've done it.

So far, I think I've done okay at listening to my BH's needs, making time to romance him and/or be with him, talking with him regularly and helping him process, and reading the aforementioned books with him. He says he trusts me completely, I've not seen him trigger too much, and he says he forgives me. I will spend the rest of my life trying to make it up to him, help him process, help him through triggers if he gets them, and keep my finger on the pulse of his moods and needs.

I still get flashbacks and triggers of my own regarding the A and the OM on occasion (I can't walk past someone who resembles him without wanting to be sick) and I still, very very often, have almost unbearable episodes of self-hatred. But I destroyed my BH's whole life, and I deserve the self-hatred for a good long while.

This got really vent-y, sidetracked, and long, but the point is that I, and other Borderlines and Cluster Bs, want to learn to love the people in their lives. We want to stop hurting others. We want to help our BSs. We want to learn how to accept love. We don't mean to be monsters, and we're very, very sorry.



Last edited by EllaSuaveterre; 12-26-2016 at 05:51 AM.
EllaSuaveterre is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-25-2016, 09:47 PM
Member
 
soulpotato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,094
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Hugs from someone else with BPD (and who was a wayward). Very brave post. You're a beautiful and loving person. Hang in there.

Your hand got too cold and I lost the grip.
From that day, I kept a message that you sent.

-Biomekkanik/Pitch Black Ocean
soulpotato is offline  
post #3 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-25-2016, 10:15 PM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,404
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Hugs also from someone married to a diagnosed but untreated BPD. Your introspection is remarkable and most heartwarming.
john117 is offline  
 
post #4 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-26-2016, 10:22 AM
Member
 
veganmermaid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 43
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Thank you for writing this post.

I see posts everywhere on the internet that really seem to suggest people with mood disorders are sinister, malicious, bad, incurable, and that's really not true for most cases. As you mentioned, borderline can be treated via DBT; I believe Prozac has also been used with success for some cases.

With many mental illnesses, I've been disheartened to read/hear/see people conflate the person with the illness.

As an example, I suffer from anorexia nervosa and OCD (which is NOT the same thing as being a type-A neat freak -- that is obsessive compulsive personality disorder, OCPD), and complex PTSD. Right now I'm experiencing an awful relapse with my eating disorder, brought about by my C-PTSD. I have a hard time doing anything but going to work because I've overheard enough comments to know that outsiders look at me and say / think "She's anorexic" (or worse; I know I look disgustingly thin, thank you very much random strangers) which is a big distinction from "she has anorexia."

Culturally we do the same thing with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, etc. I hate it. I hate hearing "He is bipolar" or "she is schizophrenic" -- no, he HAS bipolar disorder; she HAS schizophrenia. People with mental illnesses, including mood and personality disorders, are still people. They are not their diagnoses.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
veganmermaid is offline  
post #5 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-26-2016, 02:39 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 72
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

So many people with these types of personality disorders are not as introspective & open as you. They are often very selfish conditions which limit empathy & compassion for others....AND stop sufferers from seeking treatment.

Thank you so very much for sharing.
ShatteredStill is offline  
post #6 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-26-2016, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
EllaSuaveterre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 512
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by john117 View Post
Hugs also from someone married to a diagnosed but untreated BPD. Your introspection is remarkable and most heartwarming.
I've got a few questions if I may. How does your wife's BPD affect you?

In what ways does she act out/self-destruct/self-sabotage?

How do you react to her changing moods and volatile behavior?

Why can't she or won't she get treatment? Is she one of those who has been dismissed by multiple doctors for non-compliance, because that's really common with BPD.

Especially burning question: what do you wish she would say or do to facilitate her own healing and/or yours?

Sorry to bombard you with so many questions, but it's rare to get a window into the mind of the other side, so to speak.

EllaSuaveterre is offline  
post #7 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-30-2016, 06:32 AM
Member
 
As'laDain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,169
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by EllaSuaveterre View Post
I see a lot of posts- and occasionally even whole threads, on TAM or LoveShack or SurvivingInfidelity about "Cluster B" personality disordered people, particularly Borderline personality disorder. Especially in cases where the BPD-afflicted person is a WS, the advice ranges from "Dump them immediately" to "Lock them up. Cluster-B people can't love."

Now, I'm not going to argue whether cluster-B people cannot love or feel empathy. Because I don't know. I have Borderline Personality Disorder. I'm also a Wayward Wife. I don't know if my capacity to love or to empathize with other people is as strong as everyone else's. But I will tell you that I want to love and be loved with all my heart, and I think I can safely speak for most other Borderlines and say they want the same. At its core, from what I've learned in DBT (the therapy for BPD, which I've been in since my A in 2014) BPD is a fear of abandonment. A fear of being left alone and having to look after and/or put up with yourself.

The stereotypical picture of the Borderline Wayward is someone who doesn't give a rat's tail about anyone but themselves, has no idea how to love or feel anything but rage and contempt, and will burn you in your bed for looking at them the wrong way.

I'm not like that. I get angry and have vindictive feelings more often than most, but I never act on them. The only person I ever take my anger and pain out on is myself. If somebody leaves me or slights me, I will probably be angry for a few weeks and grieved for a few months, but the only person I ever truly blame for their absence is myself. I've struggled with self-harm, suicidal ideation, eating disorders, and generally non-existent self-esteem. I couldn't hurt anyone who would, in my mind, lessen their quality of life by loving me. Not knowingly anyway.

During my A, I was not maniacally laughing and saying, "I'm going to ruin my husband's life! He'll never know what hit him! He deserves to be so miserable! Muahahahaha!!!" No way. I hated myself. I hated what I (at the time felt I) was being forced to do. I felt I had little to no agency in ending the affair. I genuinely felt my husband would be better off if I left him and/or died, both of which would have eventually happened if the A continued.

And I only chose to start the affair because I was afraid my husband was going to leave me and I couldn't bear to be alone.

Why did I think he was going to leave me? Because I hated myself. Why on earth wouldn't he hate me too? The OM was abusive, but I didn't see it as abuse at the time. I thought the OM knew how horrible I was and was only treating me like I deserved. Any kindness was too good to be real. My H would be better off if the OM murdered me. At least I'd be out of his hair.

For the entire first year post-A, I was too wrapped up in healing from the anxiety and depression the A gave me (I'm aware that sounds horrible to say) and for the second year, I am truly ashamed to admit I didn't classify what I had done as infidelity because OM was abusive. Now, as of about July of this year, I have started reading and understanding more about what I did to my BH and how I can help him.

Now that I've read "Who Will You Become", "How to Help your Spouse Heal From Your Affair", and "Not Just Friends", I have realized that I, in spite of being abused myself, also abused my poor, undeserving, gentle husband. I could have ended the affair- abuse or not, mortal terror or not- at any time, and I chose not to. My beloved BH didn't ask for any of this. I did. I have come to realize how utterly misguided it was to think that an exit affair would leave him without hurt feelings and/or with a sense of relief that I was gone. A WS can be the most vile piece of hot garbage in the world, and an A can and likely will still leave the BS with severe trauma that is equivalent to a soldier's battlefield PTSD. Now that I know that, I absolutely despise myself for having hurt my BS like that. It's been a serious struggle not to relapse into self-harm or anorexia in order to numb the self-loathing. But so far I've done it.

So far, I think I've done okay at listening to my BH's needs, making time to romance him and/or be with him, talking with him regularly and helping him process, and reading the aforementioned books with him. He says he trusts me completely, I've not seen him trigger too much, and he says he forgives me. I will spend the rest of my life trying to make it up to him, help him process, help him through triggers if he gets them, and keep my finger on the pulse of his moods and needs.

I still get flashbacks and triggers of my own regarding the A and the OM on occasion (I can't walk past someone who resembles him without wanting to be sick) and I still, very very often, have almost unbearable episodes of self-hatred. But I destroyed my BH's whole life, and I deserve the self-hatred for a good long while.

This got really vent-y, sidetracked, and long, but the point is that I, and other Borderlines and Cluster Bs, want to learn to love the people in their lives. We want to stop hurting others. We want to help our BSs. We want to learn how to accept love. We don't mean to be monsters, and we're very, very sorry.
this.

what you just stated mirror exactly what my wife has said before. She hates herself because she keeps making bad decisions despite logically knowing better. or at least, she used to. nowadays, it is infrequent that she does anything destructive.

she identifies with the disney character stitch. at one point, lilo draws a picture of him and fills it in with either blue or red, depending on how bad or good stitch is. lilo keeps trying to tell stitch that even though he does bad things sometimes, he is still good over all. he does enough good to still be considered good. well, when stitch has a problem that causes him to act out with destructive behavior, stitch takes the drawing and erases all the blue and fills it in with red. he judges himself far more harshly than lilo does.

in the story, stitch had a problem that he had no control of. but in real life, my wife often felt like she had no control over her own actions. she would feel overwhelmed by emotion and acted out of them, desperately trying to feel better, safer, more secure. the idea of choosing to act despite the emotions was a foreign concept to her. it would be fake, mocking.

the thing is though, she never really felt safe and loved. she couldn't accept that anyone else could love her because she saw herself as bad. it took me a while to find a way to let her know that i don't love her for who she is. i love her because its who i am.

at first, she didn't like that. it meant that there was nothing special about her that caused me to love her. at the same time, she has started to realize that she cant be "too bad". i don't love her because she is good or bad. i love her because i choose to.

but, i also want her to love herself, so i find ways to motivate her with "rewards" and "punishments" in order to get her to do things that SHE can be proud of. hence our dynamic.

they say that BPD is basically having the emotional age of a child. if people can accept that and treat them the way they would an actual child, then living with them becomes no more difficult than raising a child. it also comes with all the fulfillment of raising a child. many of the same challenges and rewards.

if your husband is anything like me, then the best thing you can do for him is to learn to do good things despite how you feel. because if you can show that you can choose to do good things despite how you feel, you can become someone you can be proud of. you can love yourself. and if you can love yourself, then your husband wont ever have to worry about you. he will be free to just love you and enjoy your company.

"The ecologist is continually having to look at the aspects of nature with which he is unfamiliar and perforce must be an amateur for much of his working time.... professionals may carp at omissions, misconstructions, or even downright errors in these pages. perhaps ultimately they may forgive them for the sake of the overall vision that only the amateur, or the ecologist, blithely sets out to experience."G. Evelyn Hutchinson
As'laDain is offline  
post #8 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-30-2016, 08:23 AM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,404
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by As'laDain View Post
they say that BPD is basically having the emotional age of a child. if people can accept that and treat them the way they would an actual child, then living with them becomes no more difficult than raising a child. it also comes with all the fulfillment of raising a child. many of the same challenges and rewards.
You don't have the same expectations from an adult than you do from a child, and the interaction between an adult and a child is very limited compared to the interaction between two adults.
john117 is offline  
post #9 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-30-2016, 09:47 AM
Member
 
As'laDain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,169
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by john117 View Post
You don't have the same expectations from an adult than you do from a child, and the interaction between an adult and a child is very limited compared to the interaction between two adults.
of course. an adult with a childlike mentality or emotional maturity is not the same thing as a child. you certainly cannot exert control over them in the same ways you can a child. but they do respond to things, emotionally, as children do.

not that anyone should stay in a relationship with them if they don't want to. i find my relationship with my wife to be fulfilling, but the next man may not.

everyone should decide for themselves if they can accept the way these people are.

unfortunately, it will always be easier to despise them than understand them.

"The ecologist is continually having to look at the aspects of nature with which he is unfamiliar and perforce must be an amateur for much of his working time.... professionals may carp at omissions, misconstructions, or even downright errors in these pages. perhaps ultimately they may forgive them for the sake of the overall vision that only the amateur, or the ecologist, blithely sets out to experience."G. Evelyn Hutchinson
As'laDain is offline  
post #10 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-30-2016, 10:02 AM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,404
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

There's baseline expectations of adult-ness, so it's not Bob will accept someone as a partner with a stunted emotional state if he fully knows about it and Jill does nothing about it.

You're presented a fairy tale, an ideation, and by the time you find out the truth it's likely a bit too late. It has nothing to do with accepting or despising someone.

Also, the amount of, how to put it mildly, NotNormalPeople (tm) behavior is not constant over time. If it can be held in check, then things are good.

Openness, transparency, and willingness to work at it are crucial for a relationship like this to survive.


Last edited by john117; 12-30-2016 at 10:07 AM.
john117 is offline  
post #11 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-30-2016, 12:29 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
EllaSuaveterre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 512
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by john117 View Post
There's baseline expectations of adult-ness, so it's not Bob will accept someone as a partner with a stunted emotional state if he fully knows about it and Jill does nothing about it.

You're presented a fairy tale, an ideation, and by the time you find out the truth it's likely a bit too late. It has nothing to do with accepting or despising someone.

Also, the amount of, how to put it mildly, NotNormalPeople (tm) behavior is not constant over time. If it can be held in check, then things are good.

Openness, transparency, and willingness to work at it are crucial for a relationship like this to survive.
My husband knows about my childlike mentality, and he embraces it. Yes, there's a baseline of what's acceptable and what's not, but it's probably set a bit lower than in other relationships.

Maybe our relationship really is a fairy tale, the kind that comes true... orrrrr maybe I'm just busy planning the date day I've been looking forward to for a month and I'm just over-the-top in love right now.

EllaSuaveterre is offline  
post #12 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 12:50 AM
Member
 
As'laDain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,169
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

i dont think the expectations are lower. i still expect my wife to spend most of her time "adulting" because she has too. i just dont have any problems with being the one to provide her with motivation and direction in order to help her get things done.


for instance, my wife often feels incredibly anxious when there are things she must do. so much so that she cannot set out a path for herself to get everything done. she just gets overwhelmed, which causes her to hide from all of it rather than accomplish it. that doesnt work though, it leads to her feeling guilty for not getting things done and feeling ashamed for choosing to hide instead.

i used to take the thing she used to hide, like internet and such, on a temporary basis. that gave her just enough irritation/anger to forget about how anxious she was and she would get something done. then she wouldnt feel nearly as anxious anymore, and could work on the rest of it. eventually she just stopped getting mad at me altogether whenever i did it. she started seeking it out for it because she was tired of being so damn anxious all the time.

nowadays she mostly finds ways to motivate herself. she still doesnt quite know how to lead herself yet. she is pretty good at holding things down, but she doesn't really have her own vision. her vision is to be my support, in anything i do. and while i adore her for that, i would still like to see her learn to make a habit of thinking ahead without worrying ahead, if that makes any sense.

John117, my wife wasn't the one who changed things in order to make our marriage successful. she changed as a result of me changing. i changed because i saw that i would have to change if i were to have a successful and happy marriage with her. so i changed the way i did everything, and even the way i thought about everything. she had no choice but change or leave. i made sure the status quo was impossible. that is what i mean by accepting them. if you can accept the way they are, then you can learn what you have to do to change yourself and them.

of course, i acted largely out of my belief that people are always changing. given that i consider that fact, i constantly try to direct much of my own change and personal growth.

"The ecologist is continually having to look at the aspects of nature with which he is unfamiliar and perforce must be an amateur for much of his working time.... professionals may carp at omissions, misconstructions, or even downright errors in these pages. perhaps ultimately they may forgive them for the sake of the overall vision that only the amateur, or the ecologist, blithely sets out to experience."G. Evelyn Hutchinson
As'laDain is offline  
post #13 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 01:30 AM
Forum Supporter
 
Hope Shimmers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: US
Posts: 456
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Ella, have you been officially diagnosed with BPD? (I'm sorry if you said this before and I missed it)

I find it interesting, because you are very self-aware (more than most BPD'ers are), but then again. I think your level of intelligence and resulting communication skills are almost second to none. And at age 23!

So you are a highly intelligent, very articulate person who knows a hell of a lot more about life than almost any 23 year old I have ever known. Yet, you admittedly are emotionally at a level that others may have surpassed by your age, in terms of relationships anyway.

Honestly, I have no idea. You are so self-aware, and by definition, BPDers don't see that they have BPD (thus why it's so hard to treat). You are a fascinating person.

Don't let people become a priority in your life when you're just an option in theirs.
Hope Shimmers is offline  
post #14 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 02:25 AM
Member
 
As'laDain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,169
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hope Shimmers View Post
Ella, have you been officially diagnosed with BPD? (I'm sorry if you said this before and I missed it)

I find it interesting, because you are very self-aware (more than most BPD'ers are), but then again. I think your level of intelligence and resulting communication skills are almost second to none. And at age 23!

So you are a highly intelligent, very articulate person who knows a hell of a lot more about life than almost any 23 year old I have ever known. Yet, you admittedly are emotionally at a level that others may have surpassed by your age, in terms of relationships anyway.

Honestly, I have no idea. You are so self-aware, and by definition, BPDers don't see that they have BPD (thus why it's so hard to treat). You are a fascinating person.
something i find interesting is that most of the people i have met who identify as a "little", as in, have the childlike personalities and tendencies, have been diagnosed with BPD. most of the ones who have not been diagnosed still show most of the hallmarks.

when my wife discovered the CG/l dynamic, she was terrified to bring it up to me. it was something she needed like water, in order to feel safe. she was terrified that she was going to mess up too bad some day and lose me. it took me a while to pry it out of her. she was terrified that i would reject her and think that there was something wrong with her.

with the way the world views BPDers in general, it doesnt surprise me that NOBODY wants to be diagnosed with it. its like being diagnosed with sociopathy; the world loves to hate a sociopath.

i think the CG/l dynamic is attractive to a lot of BPDers because it addresses that fear of abandonment. at its core, it is a dynamic that places the responsibility of caring for and leading the submissive, or "little" in the hands of the dominant party, or care giver. that means that if the little does something bad, or displays bad behavior, its the CGs job to do something to get them back on track, and then guide them and teach them how to act in order to be a compatible partner.

these types of relationships are certainly not for everyone, but when you think about the volatility of the BPDer and their stunted ability to regulate their own behavior in light of their emotions, it seems that this may be the most successful relationship model for them.

i think the reason why Ella is so good at introspection is because she found someone she can actually be safe with. she now believes that she is not going to be abandoned. so now she is left with the same question that my wife was left with when she realized that i love her despite her: "why does he love me? nobody has ever loved me enough to really accept me before..."

its a powerful question. it doesnt make sense. the only way to really understand the answer is to learn to love yourself.

and that takes a LOT of introspection and acceptance...

"The ecologist is continually having to look at the aspects of nature with which he is unfamiliar and perforce must be an amateur for much of his working time.... professionals may carp at omissions, misconstructions, or even downright errors in these pages. perhaps ultimately they may forgive them for the sake of the overall vision that only the amateur, or the ecologist, blithely sets out to experience."G. Evelyn Hutchinson
As'laDain is offline  
post #15 of 41 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 03:14 AM
Member
 
PieceOfSky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,800
Re: On Cluster B and Borderline

Ella,

May I ask what age you remember first having feelings of self-hatred? And, is there some sort of therapy you know of that might have helped you back then (e.g. DBT).

Thanks for sharing.

"We are only here briefly, and in this moment I want to allow myself joy." -- Amy, from Spike Jonze's "Her"
PieceOfSky is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on Talk About Marriage, you must first register. Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

Important! Your username will be visible to the public next to anything you post and could show up in search engines like Google. If you are concerned about anonymity, PLEASE choose a username that will not be recognizable to anyone you know.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome