How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States? - Page 7 - Talk About Marriage
Politics and Religion This is the place to discuss politics, morality, religion, and anything controversial.

User Tag List

 202Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
post #91 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 02:54 PM
Member
 
bandit.45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 17,419
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jld View Post
It's a label. An exclusive club.
So you and Cletus are telling me that Ivy League students are no better educated or smarter than kids who go to state?

bandit.45 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #92 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 02:56 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: MI
Posts: 3,655
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
So you and Cletus are telling me that Ivy League students are no better educated or smarter than kids who go to state?
On average they are better, but not that much better. If you get C's at Harvard today, you are most likely too lazy to get much better than B or C at state U.
naiveonedave is offline  
post #93 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 02:58 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 189
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by naiveonedave View Post
On average they are better, but not that much better. If you get C's at Harvard today, you are most likely too lazy to get much better than B or C at state U.
Most CEOs were C students. Many Presidents, too. Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates are college drop outs.

Harvard puts you in an exclusive club with top contacts for life. Who you know is as important as what you know.
Anon here is offline  
 
post #94 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:01 PM
jld
Forum Supporter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 20,116
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
So you and Cletus are telling me that Ivy League students are no better educated or smarter than kids who go to state?
I told you my daughter beat that kid from Yale (Berkeley is a state school) in that national science competition. And just yesterday she got a job offer, to a leadership/rotational program for new grads, no less, from a major corporation. All that from an education at a state school that has cost us around $5k a year for the last 3 years (one year it was about $8k).

And last week, when my son toured the same school, a girl in the SE program told us she interned over the summer at Microsoft, and would be working for them upon graduation. Pretty good outcome from a state school, no?

One of the deepest feminine pleasures is when a man stands full, present, and unreactive in the midst of his woman's emotional storms. When he stays present with her, and loves her through the layers of wildness and closure, then she feels his trustability, and she can relax. -- David Deida, The Way of the Superior Man
jld is offline  
post #95 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:01 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,898
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon here View Post
Trump's estimated annual income in 2014 was $362 million dollars. No "attaboy" earned by forgoing $400K.
I don't know exactly how much Hilary made last year, but I'm sure it was in the millions and I didn't hear her say she would forego the President's salary should she win.
karole is offline  
post #96 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:06 PM
Member
 
Cletus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,509
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
So you and Cletus are telling me that Ivy League students are no better educated or smarter than kids who go to state?
Are they better educated? Perhaps. Probably not in my area of expertise, to which they do not cater with the exception of MIT. I don't think I've ever met a graduate from the Harvard school of Electrical Engineering. The MIT grads I've worked with have been qualified but not spectacular in any way. The brightest kid I ever met at work was a graduate of Harvey Mudd, for whatever that's worth.

Are they smarter? No smarter than the smart kids who go to a state school who, for whatever reason, cannot go or choose not to go to Harvard.

You can get an excellent education in many places not in the Ivy league. The error people make is in assuming that anyone smart enough to go to the Ivy League actually goes to the Ivy League. In my chosen career, this just isn't the case.

College is 90% what you put into it, not what it puts into you.
Cletus is offline  
post #97 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:11 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: United States
Posts: 10,485
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Anon,
The NY Times did financial research on Trump.

Article was in October of this year.
------
On the financial disclosure forms that Donald J. Trump has pointed to as proof of his tremendous success, no venture looks more gold-plated than his golf resort in Doral, Fla., where he reported revenues of $50 million in 2014. That figure accounted for the biggest share of what he described as his income for the year.

But this summer, a considerably different picture emerged in an austere government hearing room in Miami, where Mr. Trump’s company was challenging the resort’s property tax bill.

Mr. Trump’s lawyer handed the magistrate an income and expense statement showing that the gross revenue had indeed been $50 million. But after paying operating costs, the resort had actually lost $2.4 million.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly held out his financial disclosures as a justification for breaking with tradition and refusing to release his personal tax returns. “You don’t learn that much from tax returns,” he said in September during his first debate with Hillary Clinton. “You learn a lot from financial disclosure. And you should go down and take a look at that.”

But an examination of his tax appeals on several properties, and other documents obtained by The New York Times through Freedom of Information requests, shows that what Mr. Trump has reported on those forms is nowhere near a complete picture of his financial state.

The records demonstrate that large portions of those numbers represent cash coming into his businesses before covering costs like mortgage payments, payroll and maintenance. After expenses, some of his businesses make a small fraction of what he reported on his disclosure forms, or actually lose money. In fact, it is virtually impossible to determine from the forms just how much he is earning in any year.

Mr. Trump appears to have used a provision in federal ethics laws that allows business owners to list gross revenue, as opposed to net income after expenses, on their disclosure forms. But he does not seem to have completely acknowledged that choice. Rather, he has suggested that the figures on the form represent money in his pocket.

In news releases, the Trump campaign said that “Mr. Trump’s income” listed in a disclosure form filed last year was $362 million, and was more than $557 million in a form filed this year. During the debate with Mrs. Clinton in September, he mentioned an even larger figure.
“It shows income … in fact, the income — I just looked today — the income is filed at $694 million for this past year, $694 million,” Mr. Trump said. “If you would have told me I was going to make that 15 or 20 years ago, I would have been very surprised.”
A spokeswoman for Mr. Trump, Hope Hicks, declined to answer questions about how Mr. Trump had reported his income, saying only that his disclosure form “speaks for itself.”
Another seeming cash cow, at least as far as the forms portray it, is 40 Wall Street, an office building Mr. Trump has spoken of as perhaps the greatest bargain he ever struck. “I make approximately $20 million a year in rentals from 40 Wall Street and the building is now worth $500 million,” Mr. Trump wrote in “Trump Never Give Up,” published in 2008. “So, aside from owning the most beautiful building in Lower Manhattan, I have the added attraction of making a profit.”
On his financial disclosure forms, Mr. Trump listed the income he derived from rents in the building in the highest category on the form — more than $5 million. (The form requires listing monetary ranges for most types of income, and precise dollar figures where the gross revenue of a business is provided.)
But the income and expense statement that he filed with the New York City Tax Commission to appeal his property taxes shows that after mortgage payments and other costs, the building produced a cash flow of about $104,000 in 2014. Over the previous three years, it had generated a negative cash flow of $5.5 million, as the fallout of the 2008 financial crisis took a toll on downtown office buildings.
Last year, the building rebounded and turned a significant profit: Occupancy rose to 95 percent, according to securities filings. The building’s cash flow after expenses was just under $3 million, still well below the more than $5 million that Mr. Trump reported on his disclosure forms. The building also paid the Trump Organization $966,000 last year in management fees.
Joel Rosenfeld, a real estate accountant and New York University professor who reviewed some of the filings at The Times’s request, said Mr. Trump’s narrow margins at 40 Wall Street before last year raised questions about the building’s long-term prospects. “He may have turned the corner,” Mr. Rosenfeld said.
The recent negative cash flow at two of Mr. Trump’s premier properties raises possible motivations he may have for not releasing his tax returns: They could show that his success is not as he has claimed, or that he pays little or nothing in federal taxes. That could be a continuation of a long trend. An article last month in The Times revealed that Mr. Trump’s 1995 tax records showed a $916 million loss that could have allowed Mr. Trump to legally avoid paying federal income taxes for up to 18 years.
While the property tax appeals are a useful reality check on individual properties, they provide an imperfect window to Mr. Trump’s overall income and wealth.
The income and expense statements in such appeals are not available on every Trump property for every year. Also, the performance of a few properties cannot reflect the entirety of Mr. Trump’s endeavors, which have included the successful “Apprentice” reality television series as well as naming rights and management fees he earns from buildings in New York and elsewhere. And the nine-figure numbers Mr. Trump presents as his income do not include streams like royalties, investments and capital gains.
But the appeals show a level of detail absent in other documents that have become public. While appeals on residential properties are based on appraisals that have a level of subjectivity, commercial appeals typically start with the amount of income a business makes after expenses. The appeals filed in New York include figures that were certified by a public accountant and sworn to by Mr. Trump, under penalty of prosecution if he intentionally misstated them. They were supported by rent rolls and other documentation.
At the Trump International Hotel and Tower, on Columbus Circle in Manhattan, Mr. Trump owns a parking garage and the restaurant space occupied by Jean Georges. On his disclosure forms, Mr. Trump listed his income from the garage and the restaurant space as between $1 million and $5 million. On the income and expense statements he filed in a property tax appeal for 2015, he showed gross income of $1.6 million on the spaces. But after he paid operating expenses and mortgage payments, only $43,000 was left for the year. His company did collect a $50,000 management fee on the two spaces.
At some of Mr. Trump’s properties, the cash generated is closer to, or matches, what showed up on his financial disclosure forms. For example, at the first apartment building he developed in Manhattan, Trump Tower, the 18 floors of office and retail spaces that a Trump entity owns produced positive cash flow of $13 million in 2015, even after mortgage payments. That would match the claim on his financial disclosure form of making more than $5 million on the spaces.
But time and again, what the form presented as income did not match what was reported in other documents. Mr. Trump also runs several publicly owned attractions — the carousel and ice rinks in Central Park and a golf course in the Bronx — under agreements with New York City.
Mr. Trump’s disclosure forms reported income from the Wollman and Lasker ice rinks of just under $13 million last year, and $8.6 million the year before. But accounting figures provided by his company to the city show that those figures represent gross receipts. And city contract documents show that out of that amount, he had to turn over to the city 28 percent of gross receipts and 56 percent of food sales, and cover expenses like utility payments and salaries. Recent figures were not available, but a 2011 city audit showed that for the previous three years, an average of $25,340 a year for both rinks was left after expenses.
On the disclosure form he filed this year, which apparently covered 2015 and part of 2016, more than half of Mr. Trump’s claimed income was generated by his golf resorts. As an industry, privately owned golf resorts lost 2 cents for every dollar in revenue for the year that ended in September, and that was the industry’s best year since the 2008 recession, according to Sageworks, a financial information company.
In recent years, Mr. Trump has made major investments in golf resorts. He bought the Doral golf resort near Miami in 2012 for $150 million, of which $104 million represented the real estate for property tax purposes.
After the appeal of his property taxes was heard in June, the special magistrate, Leonardo Delgado, lowered the resort’s property taxes by $46,534.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon here View Post
Trump's estimated annual income in 2014 was $362 million dollars. No "attaboy" earned by forgoing $400K.
MEM2020 is online now  
post #98 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:16 PM
jld
Forum Supporter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 20,116
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
Are they better educated? Perhaps. Probably not in my area of expertise, to which they do not cater with the exception of MIT. I don't think I've ever met a graduate from the Harvard school of Electrical Engineering. The MIT grads I've worked with have been qualified but not spectacular in any way. The brightest kid I ever met at work was a graduate of Harvey Mudd, for whatever that's worth.

Are they smarter? No smarter than the smart kids who go to a state school who, for whatever reason, cannot go or choose not to go to Harvard.

You can get an excellent education in many places not in the Ivy league. The error people make is in assuming that anyone smart enough to go to the Ivy League actually goes to the Ivy League. In my chosen career, this just isn't the case.

College is 90% what you put into it, not what it puts into you.
Totally agree with the bolded.

My daughter has done better than most, if not all, of her friends in school, including kids who were National Merit Scholars and several who came in with many AP credits. She loves her field, loved the research she did, and has had a fabulous work ethic her whole life. I cannot imagine a young person putting more in, and getting more out, of college than my highly-motivated daughter.

One of the deepest feminine pleasures is when a man stands full, present, and unreactive in the midst of his woman's emotional storms. When he stays present with her, and loves her through the layers of wildness and closure, then she feels his trustability, and she can relax. -- David Deida, The Way of the Superior Man
jld is offline  
post #99 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:19 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 189
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by karole View Post
I don't know exactly how much Hilary made last year, but I'm sure it was in the millions and I didn't hear her say she would forego the President's salary should she win.
Didn't hear Trump say he would give up his interests in the 500+ businesses he owns/has interest in.
Anon here is offline  
post #100 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:25 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 189
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MEM2020 View Post
Anon,
The NY Times did financial research on Trump.

Article was in October of this year.
------
On the financial disclosure forms that Donald J. Trump has pointed to as proof of his tremendous success, no venture looks more gold-plated than his golf resort in Doral, Fla., where he reported revenues of $50 million in 2014. That figure accounted for the biggest share of what he described as his income for the year.

But this summer, a considerably different picture emerged in an austere government hearing room in Miami, where Mr. Trump’s company was challenging the resort’s property tax bill.

Mr. Trump’s lawyer handed the magistrate an income and expense statement showing that the gross revenue had indeed been $50 million. But after paying operating costs, the resort had actually lost $2.4 million.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly held out his financial disclosures as a justification for breaking with tradition and refusing to release his personal tax returns. “You don’t learn that much from tax returns,” he said in September during his first debate with Hillary Clinton. “You learn a lot from financial disclosure. And you should go down and take a look at that.”

But an examination of his tax appeals on several properties, and other documents obtained by The New York Times through Freedom of Information requests, shows that what Mr. Trump has reported on those forms is nowhere near a complete picture of his financial state.

The records demonstrate that large portions of those numbers represent cash coming into his businesses before covering costs like mortgage payments, payroll and maintenance. After expenses, some of his businesses make a small fraction of what he reported on his disclosure forms, or actually lose money. In fact, it is virtually impossible to determine from the forms just how much he is earning in any year.

Mr. Trump appears to have used a provision in federal ethics laws that allows business owners to list gross revenue, as opposed to net income after expenses, on their disclosure forms. But he does not seem to have completely acknowledged that choice. Rather, he has suggested that the figures on the form represent money in his pocket.

In news releases, the Trump campaign said that “Mr. Trump’s income” listed in a disclosure form filed last year was $362 million, and was more than $557 million in a form filed this year. During the debate with Mrs. Clinton in September, he mentioned an even larger figure.
“It shows income … in fact, the income — I just looked today — the income is filed at $694 million for this past year, $694 million,” Mr. Trump said. “If you would have told me I was going to make that 15 or 20 years ago, I would have been very surprised.”
A spokeswoman for Mr. Trump, Hope Hicks, declined to answer questions about how Mr. Trump had reported his income, saying only that his disclosure form “speaks for itself.”
Another seeming cash cow, at least as far as the forms portray it, is 40 Wall Street, an office building Mr. Trump has spoken of as perhaps the greatest bargain he ever struck. “I make approximately $20 million a year in rentals from 40 Wall Street and the building is now worth $500 million,” Mr. Trump wrote in “Trump Never Give Up,” published in 2008. “So, aside from owning the most beautiful building in Lower Manhattan, I have the added attraction of making a profit.”
On his financial disclosure forms, Mr. Trump listed the income he derived from rents in the building in the highest category on the form — more than $5 million. (The form requires listing monetary ranges for most types of income, and precise dollar figures where the gross revenue of a business is provided.)
But the income and expense statement that he filed with the New York City Tax Commission to appeal his property taxes shows that after mortgage payments and other costs, the building produced a cash flow of about $104,000 in 2014. Over the previous three years, it had generated a negative cash flow of $5.5 million, as the fallout of the 2008 financial crisis took a toll on downtown office buildings.
Last year, the building rebounded and turned a significant profit: Occupancy rose to 95 percent, according to securities filings. The building’s cash flow after expenses was just under $3 million, still well below the more than $5 million that Mr. Trump reported on his disclosure forms. The building also paid the Trump Organization $966,000 last year in management fees.
Joel Rosenfeld, a real estate accountant and New York University professor who reviewed some of the filings at The Times’s request, said Mr. Trump’s narrow margins at 40 Wall Street before last year raised questions about the building’s long-term prospects. “He may have turned the corner,” Mr. Rosenfeld said.
The recent negative cash flow at two of Mr. Trump’s premier properties raises possible motivations he may have for not releasing his tax returns: They could show that his success is not as he has claimed, or that he pays little or nothing in federal taxes. That could be a continuation of a long trend. An article last month in The Times revealed that Mr. Trump’s 1995 tax records showed a $916 million loss that could have allowed Mr. Trump to legally avoid paying federal income taxes for up to 18 years.
While the property tax appeals are a useful reality check on individual properties, they provide an imperfect window to Mr. Trump’s overall income and wealth.
The income and expense statements in such appeals are not available on every Trump property for every year. Also, the performance of a few properties cannot reflect the entirety of Mr. Trump’s endeavors, which have included the successful “Apprentice” reality television series as well as naming rights and management fees he earns from buildings in New York and elsewhere. And the nine-figure numbers Mr. Trump presents as his income do not include streams like royalties, investments and capital gains.
But the appeals show a level of detail absent in other documents that have become public. While appeals on residential properties are based on appraisals that have a level of subjectivity, commercial appeals typically start with the amount of income a business makes after expenses. The appeals filed in New York include figures that were certified by a public accountant and sworn to by Mr. Trump, under penalty of prosecution if he intentionally misstated them. They were supported by rent rolls and other documentation.
At the Trump International Hotel and Tower, on Columbus Circle in Manhattan, Mr. Trump owns a parking garage and the restaurant space occupied by Jean Georges. On his disclosure forms, Mr. Trump listed his income from the garage and the restaurant space as between $1 million and $5 million. On the income and expense statements he filed in a property tax appeal for 2015, he showed gross income of $1.6 million on the spaces. But after he paid operating expenses and mortgage payments, only $43,000 was left for the year. His company did collect a $50,000 management fee on the two spaces.
At some of Mr. Trump’s properties, the cash generated is closer to, or matches, what showed up on his financial disclosure forms. For example, at the first apartment building he developed in Manhattan, Trump Tower, the 18 floors of office and retail spaces that a Trump entity owns produced positive cash flow of $13 million in 2015, even after mortgage payments. That would match the claim on his financial disclosure form of making more than $5 million on the spaces.
But time and again, what the form presented as income did not match what was reported in other documents. Mr. Trump also runs several publicly owned attractions — the carousel and ice rinks in Central Park and a golf course in the Bronx — under agreements with New York City.
Mr. Trump’s disclosure forms reported income from the Wollman and Lasker ice rinks of just under $13 million last year, and $8.6 million the year before. But accounting figures provided by his company to the city show that those figures represent gross receipts. And city contract documents show that out of that amount, he had to turn over to the city 28 percent of gross receipts and 56 percent of food sales, and cover expenses like utility payments and salaries. Recent figures were not available, but a 2011 city audit showed that for the previous three years, an average of $25,340 a year for both rinks was left after expenses.
On the disclosure form he filed this year, which apparently covered 2015 and part of 2016, more than half of Mr. Trump’s claimed income was generated by his golf resorts. As an industry, privately owned golf resorts lost 2 cents for every dollar in revenue for the year that ended in September, and that was the industry’s best year since the 2008 recession, according to Sageworks, a financial information company.
In recent years, Mr. Trump has made major investments in golf resorts. He bought the Doral golf resort near Miami in 2012 for $150 million, of which $104 million represented the real estate for property tax purposes.
After the appeal of his property taxes was heard in June, the special magistrate, Leonardo Delgado, lowered the resort’s property taxes by $46,534.
Extremely enlightening. Will read a few times; a lot to digest. Standing out: The Times revealed that Mr. Trump’s 1995 tax records showed a $916 million loss that could have allowed Mr. Trump to legally avoid paying federal income taxes for up to 18 years.

If it's legal, he would certainly do it. Practical man. Can't wait to see how this translates to his fiscal policy.

Anon here is offline  
post #101 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:34 PM
Member
 
Cletus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,509
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon here View Post
Extremely enlightening. Will read a few times; a lot to digest. Standing out: The Times revealed that Mr. Trump’s 1995 tax records showed a $916 million loss that could have allowed Mr. Trump to legally avoid paying federal income taxes for up to 18 years.

If it's legal, he would certainly do it. Practical man. Can't wait to see how this translates to his fiscal policy.
How do you translate avoiding paying taxes into fiscal policy? I get it might be the genesis for the statement that Mexico would pay for the wall, but it doesn't seem all that practical.

You and I paid for his billion dollar writeoff. Which, if done legally, I cannot fault him for taking. So he may be very good at avoiding taxes.

In my industry, we have two kinds of people. Those who produce new stuff, and those who try to break it (that's their actual role). The ones doing the former are typically not very good at the latter, and vice versa.
Cletus is offline  
post #102 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 03:43 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,330
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon here View Post
Most CEOs were C students. Many Presidents, too. Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates are college drop outs.

Harvard puts you in an exclusive club with top contacts for life. Who you know is as important as what you know.
It's one thing to dropout from poor grades, it's another to dropout becaue you realise how much institutionalised learning is only repeating what others say and aiming for the middle.
Phenomena are created by people who do, then studied by academia. academia is always 5-10 years behind the real front... but they just publish more.
spotthedeaddog is offline  
post #103 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 04:07 PM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,591
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
Nope. You work your ass off to graduate those schools. No one can buy passing grades from Harvard.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...a-dean-admits/
john117 is online now  
post #104 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 04:10 PM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,591
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
A C student at Harvard or Yale would be an A student at a state university.

John F. Kennedy was average at Harvard also. He was a heavy drinker and proliferate womanizer.
Not quite. Elite schools are a lot easier to handle because if resources, smaller class sizes, better faculty...

If you have the foundation and are willing to work, of course.

Signed - guy whose immediate family has a combined 30 years of college from four people, some in elites, some in state schools.
john117 is online now  
post #105 of 196 (permalink) Old 11-11-2016, 04:12 PM
Member
 
john117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 11,591
Re: How could a "moron" win the Presidency of the United States?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bandit.45 View Post
Then why does our culture put so much value in a person being "Harvard educated"? Is that a farce?
Connections, if you're halfway there already. If you're not it won't do you much good.
john117 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on Talk About Marriage, you must first register. Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

Important! Your username will be visible to the public next to anything you post and could show up in search engines like Google. If you are concerned about anonymity, PLEASE choose a username that will not be recognizable to anyone you know.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Who will win? southbound Politics and Religion 170 12-01-2016 07:54 PM
Raising a "future ex-wife" tech-novelist Politics and Religion 166 10-09-2016 12:43 AM
Hillary naiveonedave Politics and Religion 307 07-31-2016 09:48 AM
Constitutional Convention Ripper Politics and Religion 266 04-04-2016 07:25 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome